State of the Larder on the eve of Samhain

Lacking a good data point for 1) how much we eat of staple foods through winter and 2) how things store I’ll likely not be making any more large food acquisitions excepting meat. I could score more local apples in quantity, but I’ll limit myself to what we’ll use for fresh eating and baking in November, December, and maybe January. I could also easily acquire more squash and root veggies among other late fall/winter crops, but we’ve got a lot already in the house and I’d rather take the risk of avoiding waste, even if we end up needing to fall back on the non-local food system during winter.

To give an idea of the food I’ve amassed going into the lean times, I’ve broken it down below. Some things we already know we’ll want more of (dry cherries particularly) next year but others I don’t have a good idea about.

I think I’ve struck a good balance between scoring good deals on prime, in season produce, and not over-extending financially or oversupplying leading to waste. A verdict update at Beltane (May 1st) will show how we did, but I’m sure I’ll have remarks in the ongoing budget locavore series.

Dry Goods

  • Honey (local) – 1.5 gallons
  • Wheat (hard red winter) berries (bought via a co-op from Montana) – approx 280 pounds
  • Oats (rolled) (bought via a co-op from Iowa) – approx 290 pounds

Fruit

  • Apples (all sourced locally)
    • Apple butter – 10 pints
    • Apple chips – 18 gallon bags
    • Applesauce – 34 quarts
  • Cherries (sourced semi-locally ~60 miles away)
    • Dried – 5 pints
    • Frozen – 1.5 gallons
  • Pears (all sourced locally, we’ve kept most for fresh-eating)
    • Preserves – 4 half-pints
  • Strawberries (all sourced locally)
    • Jam – 3 pints
    • Dried – 3 quarts

Veggies

  • Green beans (all garden) – 3 quarts dry
  • Peppers (mild) – 1/2 gallon dry diced
  • Potatoes (some garden, the remainder local) – approx 80 pounds
  • Snap Peas (some garden, remainder local) – 3.5 gallons frozen
  • Tomatoes (approx half garden, half sourced locally) – 32 quarts of canned crushed/sauce base, 25 quarts of dry for rehydrating into sauce or using in sun-dried pesto sauces.
  • Winter Squash (some garden, the remainder local) – 63 assorted (mix of medium varieties like acorn, buttercup, butternut, and a few others)
  • Zucchini (all garden) – 10 quarts of dry chips, 52 cups of frozen shredded
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One Comment on “State of the Larder on the eve of Samhain”

  1. Maria says:

    Wow! Good job!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 🙂


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